Topic "Timestamp is being incremented by 1 hour"

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When I copy files from a unix box to my WinXP box the file timestamp is being incremented by 1 hour. Both systems are in the same timezone. I'm currently using WinScp 3.8.2. Have the preserve timestamp option selected.
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martin
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Would documentation help?
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Martin Prikryl
Guest




Thank you, but I unfortunately reported the wrong problem. The problem is with how the remote window displays the timestamp. The remote window displays the
timestamp incremented by one hour.

On the remote server, which is a Linux box, ls -l displays.
drwxr-xr-x 8 roberge roberge 488 Aug 14 12:37 eclipse/

However, WinSCP shows the directory having a timestamp of Aug 14 1:37:36 PM.

I verified that the session was created with the server timezone offset is set to 0.

Is there another option that I'm missing?
martin
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This is explained on the very same documentation page Smile
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Martin Prikryl
Another Guest

Guest


I have a similar problem to that originally posted here and it sure seems to me that WinSCP (3.8.0 or 3.8.2) is not handling timestamps correctly.

I have looked at all the documentation and tried out the different options it suggests and yet the behaviour still makes no sense.

When I use WinSCP to list files created on an OpenBSD host their timestamps are off by one hour compared to an 'ls -l' in the shell.

When I transfer a file from Windows to OpenBSD that timestamp gets rolled back on hour. Yet, if I transfer the same fime with the PUTTY pscp.exe application using the '-p' option the timestamp comes out correct. Why can't WinSCP work like pscp?
martin
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Another Guest wrote:
When I use WinSCP to list files created on an OpenBSD host their timestamps are off by one hour compared to an 'ls -l' in the shell.

Please read documentation.
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Martin Prikryl
Another Guest

Guest


prikryl wrote:
Another Guest wrote:
When I use WinSCP to list files created on an OpenBSD host their timestamps are off by one hour compared to an 'ls -l' in the shell.

Please read documentation.


I have the read documentation and can accept the limitation in the way WinSCP displays the timestamps from the remote hosts. However, the issue more than just the way WinSCP displays the timestamps from the remote host.

This issue is that when a file is being transfer to my OpenBSD host, WinSCP it setting the timestamp to the wrong value. WinSCP rolls the timestamp back one hour further than it should. This type of behaviour does not exist when I use PUTTY's pscp.exe to copy the same file.
martin
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Another Guest wrote:
This issue is that when a file is being transfer to my OpenBSD host, WinSCP it setting the timestamp to the wrong value. WinSCP rolls the timestamp back one hour further than it should. This type of behaviour does not exist when I use PUTTY's pscp.exe to copy the same file.

So what's the timestamp of local file as seen on local panel of WinSCP. What's the timestamp in remote panel after upload and what's the timestamp shown by 'ls -l' command? Also what's the timezone of your local machine and remote server? Thanks.
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Martin Prikryl
Another Guest

Guest


prikryl wrote:
Another Guest wrote:
This issue is that when a file is being transfer to my OpenBSD host, WinSCP it setting the timestamp to the wrong value. WinSCP rolls the timestamp back one hour further than it should. This type of behaviour does not exist when I use PUTTY's pscp.exe to copy the same file.

So what's the timestamp of local file as seen on local panel of WinSCP. What's the timestamp in remote panel after upload and what's the timestamp shown by 'ls -l' command? Also what's the timezone of your local machine and remote server? Thanks.


The timestamp of the file in the local panel is 11:03. After the file is transfered to the remote host it shows up in remote panel as 11:03 and on the remote host with 'ls -l' as 10:03.

If I copy this same file with pscp it shows up in remote panel as 12:03 and on the remote with 'ls -l' as 11:03.

If I create a new file on the remote host at the same time (eg 11:03) is shows up in the remote panel as 12:03.

I just enabled Samba on the remote host (a temporary measure for test purposed) and when I copy a file between the local (windows) machine and remote (OpenBSD) machine using drag and drop in the Windows Explorer the timestamp is propely preserved like it is when I use pscp. Also, the Windows Explorer shows timestamps for the remote files which are consistent with the 'ls -l' command on the remote machine.

I just revisited the WinSCP documentation and I guess it's behaviour could be consistent with what is documented. However, whether it's consistent with the documentation or not I still think it is a problem that needs to be addressed since my experiments clearly show that WinSCP is not behaving as one has come to expect from tools like pscp or Samba.

The local and remote machines are in the same timezone (MDT).
martin
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Another Guest wrote:
I just revisited the WinSCP documentation and I guess it's behaviour could be consistent with what is documented. However, whether it's consistent with the documentation or not I still think it is a problem that needs to be addressed since my experiments clearly show that WinSCP is not behaving as one has come to expect from tools like pscp or Samba.

WinSCP it not mere file transfer tool. Any good Windows-based tool that uses synchronization of some kind behaves like WinSCP. I'm not happy with that, but I'm not aware any better solution.
Another Guest

Guest


prikryl wrote:
Another Guest wrote:
I just revisited the WinSCP documentation and I guess it's behaviour could be consistent with what is documented. However, whether it's consistent with the documentation or not I still think it is a problem that needs to be addressed since my experiments clearly show that WinSCP is not behaving as one has come to expect from tools like pscp or Samba.

WinSCP it not mere file transfer tool. Any good Windows-based tool that uses synchronization of some kind behaves like WinSCP. I'm not happy with that, but I'm not aware any better solution.


Fair enough. I guess I was mislead by the title "SFTP and SCP client for Windows".

What's the chance of getting an option added to make the tool behave like a plain and simple SCP program that preserves timestamps during the file copies?
martin
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Another Guest wrote:
What's the chance of getting an option added to make the tool behave like a plain and simple SCP program that preserves timestamps during the file copies?

Added to TODO list Smile
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Martin Prikryl
Another Guest

Guest


prikryl wrote:
Another Guest wrote:
What's the chance of getting an option added to make the tool behave like a plain and simple SCP program that preserves timestamps during the file copies?

Added to TODO list Smile


thank you
martin
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This feature has been implemented already in4.0.
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Martin Prikryl
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