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Topic review

paulikus

-NoPreserveTime

We saw this using winscp sftp on Windows 2000 SP4 to Suse 10.2. using -NoPreserveTime option fixed the times being off on the resultant files being put/get
martin

OK, sorry, you are right. Please reply to the email, I'll sent you a debug version.
Wolfie

I didn't see anything about a trace file. How do I enable/find it?
martin

Can you sent me the trace file as I asked you for in the email?
Wolfie

martin wrote:

Wolfie wrote:

martin wrote:

What version of Windows are you using?

Windows 7 Professional x64

I have sent you a debug version.

Just loaded it up, now it's only one hour ahead of the time on the server. I'm not sure if it's because I'm one hour ahead of the server (3:20 for me now, 2:20 for the host), the DST or what have you.
martin

Wolfie wrote:

martin wrote:

What version of Windows are you using?

Windows 7 Professional x64

I have sent you a debug version.
Wolfie

martin wrote:

What version of Windows are you using?

Windows 7 Professional x64
Ron

I have posted what I think may be the same issue.

Are you using the SFTP mode or the SCP mode? If you change modes does it make a difference for you?
scsmith

martin wrote:

What version of Windows are you using?


I'm using WinXP Pro/SP3, and connecting to a CentOS Linux system in the same Country/TimeZone (UK). Doing a 'date' command on the server in Putty shows the same time as my PC, and the Linux server is showing 'BST' (British Summer Time), but looking at a file on the server in WinSCP, in Putty and also the same file transferred to my PC, I see the following...
WinSCP: 6:23:51 AM (both local and remote panels)
Putty: 10:23
PC: 11:23:52

The time on the PC is also a 'future' time.

So, as much as 5 hours out and very confusing!

Something is definitely wrong with WinSCP's date display.
martin

What version of Windows are you using?
Wolfie

The problem I'm encountering, which may be what the OP is describing, is a bug I believe and not just a simple difference between Windows and *nix.

If I sign in via SSH and look at the timestamps, they are correct. That is, one hour behind me, since that's where the hosting server is located. If I view the files in WinSCP, the time is off by 2 hours, showing as an hour ahead of me. I believe that somehow, WinSCP is trying to compensate for DST but doing it backwards (adding when it should be subtracting) or it's trying to adjust the servers file times but is overdoing it.

Either way, it's not a simple one hour difference, it's a two hour difference. I should point out that these are files that are created on and updated on the hosting server, not files being transferred via WinSCP. I know that if I look at my hosting server and see a time that is one hour behind me, that it's correct because of its location. But I find it hard to believe that an offset of two hours is being blamed on Windows -vs- *nix.

Please address this minor issue, as it is rather confusing.
martin

Re: Day saving time 1 hour older

Please read FAQ. If that does not help, come back.
jfvenne

Day saving time 1 hour older

When I use putty and using the command "ls -al" the date/time stamp of a file that just been created is ok. When I use WinSCP to display the same file the date/time stamp is 1 hour(in the future). I believe that it is related the the day saving time adjustment. Both workstation/server as the as the same time zone defined(-5 eastern us&canada) and using Putty when I use the command "date" both workstation/server is returning the same date/time.
It is causing a problem when I transfer the file from server to workstation (files are 1 hour in the future)
n.b. Workstation is windows / Server is Linux